Employment & Education

Rehab with members who have little or no experience working under the supervision of another person, who may also have difficulty completing tasks independently, to the standard set by their employer or teacher.

 

G: Jeff is a 38 y/o single Caucasian male who is diagnosed with schizophrenia. For most of his adult life, Jeff’s symptoms (A/H, delusions, paranoia, and trouble concentrating) were not well-controlled. Jeff has been on an injectable for about a year now and his symptoms have subsided, but because his functional development was interrupted by schizophrenia at an early age, he has almost no experience working. I met with Jeff today to work with him on his current objective of getting a part-time job and keeping it for at least 3 months.

I: Introduced Jeff to the skill "Assessing Task Performance", which will enable him to determine how well he did on a particular task and, based on his decision, conclude whether the task is done. I explained to Jeff that the skill was important because if he decides a task has not been performed correctly, it can alert him to the fact that he might need to pay closer attention to his work, redo parts of it, or ask for retraining or assistance. We explored Step 1 of the skill, "Identifying Performance Standards". I explained that this meant finding out ahead of time what the expectations for his assignments were, and writing down any directions he was given. I modeled asking a supervisor to spell out any step‐by‐step procedures to follow and making notes on what I was told. Suggested he show these notes to his supervisor for approval. At the end of the session I reviewed with Jeff what we covered today and why it was important.

G: Jeff is a 38 y/o single Caucasian male who is diagnosed with schizophrenia. Jeff has significant skill deficits due to being highly symptomatic for most of his adult life and never seeking or maintaining employment as a result. I met with him today to continue working with him on his current objective of getting a part-time job.

I: Reviewed material we covered last week about identifying performance standards as a first step in developing the ability to assess the quality of his work. Continued the lesson today by discussing how he should commit his supervisor’s instructions to memory. I introduced Jeff to the use of a performance checklist consisting of an itemized list of the procedures to follow for a particular task, a quality rating for each standard, and spaces for him to make notes about how he felt he did in comparison with the standard. I suggested he show the checklist to someone to be sure it included the important points. We then discussed step 2 of assessing task performance, which was rating his performance. I used a workbook to help Jeff see how he could identify his strengths, as well as areas needing improvement. Discussed how to gauge the need to change his work performance based on how closely his ratings matched those of the standard, determine whether it was a simple fix, or if he needed to make a plan for improving his performance in the future. Explained that this plan might include some re‐training or reminders to himself, and/or additional assistance. I modeled this process by creating a simple checklist for cleaning up my desk, filling it out as I worked, then having Jeff help me rate my performance and decide what to do next.

G: Jeff is a 38 y/o single Caucasian male who is diagnosed with schizophrenia. Jeff’s symptoms (A/H, delusions, paranoia, and trouble concentrating) are fairly well controlled now, but as a result of his illness he has never worked before and lacks the basic skills necessary to keep a job once he gets it. I met with Jeff today to continue working with him on his current objective of getting a part-time job and keeping it for at least 3 months.

I: Reviewed skills for self-assessing task performance that we covered in our last 2 sessions. Today we worked on task reporting. Explained to Jeff that this meant giving supervisors an idea of how well he was doing and alerting them to any problems or difficulties he might be experiencing. Clarified that supervisors may want this information at different intervals, so he should ask what their preferences are. Covered the first 2 steps in task reporting, 1) checking what he has done, and 2) recording the time taken. Explained the process for checking what has been done. I used the checklist we created in our last session and modeled noting completed tasks and ones still being worked on, estimating progress (e.g., "halfway done" or "75% done"), and making short notes on why something wasn't done. Explained the process of recording the time a task has taken him, noting that reviewing his tasks and timelines can refresh his memory of what he planned to do, or indicate the need for a plan.

G: Jeff is a 38 y/o single Caucasian male who is diagnosed with schizophrenia. Jeff has significant skill deficits as a result of being highly symptomatic for most of his adult life and having no work experience. I met with him today to continue working with him on his current objective of getting a part-time job.

I: Reviewed the first 2 steps for reporting task performance that we covered last week. Today I taught Jeff the 3rd step, which is describing his progress. Explained that preparing this information before meeting with his supervisor is important so that he has facts ahead of time in order to clearly describe his progress. I modeled how the meeting might look, talking first about tasks I had completed and then about ones I was still working on. Demonstrated using the checklist to point out where I had checked off the tasks completed and comments I had made about how far along I was with tasks in progress. I then modeled describing how how easy or hard the tasks were and how well I thought I did. I explained reasons for delays and discussed what I planned to do to address problem areas. I suggested to Jeff that this would be a good time to bring up any questions he had. We then role-played and took turns being the boss and the employee. I provided suggestions and feedback as we did this together.

 

All PHI has been de-identified per HIPAA Privacy Rule